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STENDEC

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Everything posted by STENDEC

  1. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Sure. You can make a solution much stronger than 0.25mg/ml if you want. Your gram of caber will all dissolve in 25ml of ethanol.
  2. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    No need to get that complicated. If you want to resell half a gram, use your scale to divide the powder into two 500mg lots, use one to make 100ml batches of the solution as I suggested and as you need it and move the other half.
  3. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    Shoulders Power HIIT, OHP to 200x1 PR (I am pretty sure), Lateral/Front Raises, External Rotations, Shrugs, Plate Raises That OHP felts really good....seems like I've been trying to get two bills overhead forever.
  4. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    So some of you may recall I was headed to a BB contest...as I got closer, I decided this wasn't really my thing so I bagged it. My training partner did come in second at the Jay Cutler Classic in Boston, however, so that was pretty cool. Feeling a little directionless, I thought about getting back into strongman but there's not a lot of decent local competitions out there but I did discover that the Southern Powerlifting Federation is holding a state championship event in my home city next November and I've decided to give it a shot. Apparently it's a first for New Hampshire as there are no current SPF state records but looking over records from other states for 100kg Masters II, I think I can probably at least not embarrass myself.... Of course, this means some changes. I've been DLing along but using a trap bar and frequently straps. I've also just started squatting again after about a seven year hiatus...and my bench press has come and gone but has never been my strong suit. So this week I am going to get some baseline lifts in, clean with competition form. Today I pulled 425 on the DL, straight bar, conventional form, no straps, alternate grip without too much trouble. Tomorrow I'll bench and Thursday squat and see where we are at. I suspect 315-25 and 425 but we'll see. I also purchased some Nordic lifting shoes and a belt...I've never seen anyone lift without a belt in competition so I suppose I should get used to wearing one. Needless to say, I'll be leaning heavily on the knowledge, wisdom and brotelligence of my CS gang to help me along with this.
  5. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    A digital scale accurate to 0.001g complete with calibration weights is literally $25 on Amazon.
  6. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Your math is correct but we're not interested in making a saturated solution of cabergoline in ethanol....we want a conveniently-dosed solution so we are going to dissolve far less caber into the solvent than it could theoretically hold. Given that a typical dosing scheme of cabergoline in 0.25mg several times a week, a gram of powder is literally a lifetime supply.
  7. STENDEC

    So. Not. Powerlifting...

    Plans to get more bloodwork done?
  8. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Go back and read the whole thread. Carefully. In addition to the things you already own, you will need a good scale. Dissolve exactly 25mg of the cabergoline into exactly 100ml of vodka. Save the remaining cabergoline powder for another day. This will give you a 0.25mg/ml solution.
  9. STENDEC

    Resurrection of Blu

    Speaking of semen https://www.sciencealert.com/patient-injected-himself-with-semen-thinking-it-would-cure-his-back-pain
  10. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Cabler is soluble in ethanol 45mg/ml...basic 80 proof vodka will work just fine and is completely non-toxic at ml doses. Mix it up the way I suggested and you will have a nice, easy to use solution that provides 0.25mg of cabergoline in every ml of solution...
  11. STENDEC

    So. Not. Powerlifting...

    I tried to tell you guys that warm up sets were overrated and unnecessary...
  12. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Duh. I was overthinking the concentration of the alcohol and I should have looked up how soluble it was in ethanol....it's 45mg/ml so dissolving 25mg in 100ml of even run-of-the-mill 80 proof vodka shouldn't be a problem. Thanks.
  13. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Bump for @Burton or @Growth Factor
  14. STENDEC

    Questioning The Benefits of Statins

    From Medscape A new modeling study suggests that 10-year risk thresholds used in current guidelines to prescribe statins for primary prevention of heart disease are likely substantially too low. "Instead of 7.5% to 10% 10-year risks, we found at least 14%, and depending on the age, even much higher risk thresholds where the benefits of statins exceed the harms," senior author Milo Puhan, MD, PhD, from the University of Zurich, Switzerland, told theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology. Guidelines emphasize the benefits of statins for CVD, but fail to take into account the full array of potential harms, Henock G. Yebyo, MSc, also from the University of Zurich, and colleagues argue in the study, published onlineDecember 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.[1] "The second major finding is that 1 size doesn't fit all," Dr Puhan said. "So the benefit/harm balance depends quite a bit on age and gender, but also the type of statin. The recommendations are not granulated to take these factors into account." Using an approach originally developed by the National Cancer Institute to look at tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention, the investigators show that statins provide a net benefit starting at a CVD risk of 14% for men aged 40 to 44 years. The risk threshold, however, increased to 21% for older men aged 70 to 75 years. For women, the risk thresholds were higher, at 17% and 22%, respectively. Individuals at high risk for CVD (>21%) were likely to benefit from statins, regardless of sex or age. Among 4 commonly used statins, atorvastatin had the most favorable benefit-harm balance, followed by rosuvastatin, especially for younger adults with low or medium CVD risk. "For example, among men aged 45 to 49 years, net benefits were seen at a 10-year CVD risk of 15% for atorvastatin but at risk levels of 18% for rosuvastatin, 19% for pravastatin, and 21% for simvastatin," the authors write. "The primary concern with this paper is that the harms used by the authors in their benefits vs harms analysis is based on work that has not yet been published," Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, MD, PhD, chair of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) said in an email to theheart.org | Medscape Cardiology. "This unpublished work includes a variety of harms; unfortunately, most of these have not been substantiated in other meta-analyses," she said. "Since this is the primary input that leads to the authors' findings, this work would be critical to review and assess." Nevertheless, Dr Bibbins-Domingo said the authors' approach of understanding the benefit-harms calculus by age and competing risks is the right approach to take. "All of the guidelines have continued to move towards an approach that seeks to take the benefits-harms observed across the entire adult population and tailor it to a more specific benefits-harms calculation that might apply to the individual patients," she said. "This paper suggests that such an approach does make a difference in whether statin medications can be recommended." In 2016, the USPSTF gave a grade B recommendation for primary-prevention statins in adults aged 40 to 75 years who have at least 1 CVD risk factor and 10-year risk of 10% or higher.[2] A grade C recommendation suggests statins also may be selectively offered to patients in the same age group with a 10-year risk of 7.5% to 10%, after a discussion with the patient. The newly released American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol guidelines use a risk threshold of 7.5%, but also emphasize the use of coronary artery calcium testing and patient preference.[3] Dr Puhan acknowledged that it is difficult for guideline creators and others to bring together all the evidence on treatment effects, as harm outcomes from randomized trials might be incomplete because of short follow-up and because observational data are often inherently biased. Their approach combined data from both sources for the benefits of statins on fatal and nonfatal CVD events and for the harms of myopathy, hepatic and renal dysfunction, cataracts, hemorrhagic stroke, type 2 diabetes, any cancer, nausea or headache, and treatment discontinuation. "What we did was kind of a combination, but we weighted it according to the information in the data," Dr Puhan said. "The estimates we used are much closer to the RCTs than to the observational studies." Asked to comment on the study, Michael Pencina, PhD, a professor of biostatistics and informatics at Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina, said, "On the positive side, a study like this finally attempting to formally quantify the risks of statins is long overdue." Digging deeper, however, Dr Pencina had reservations about the methodology, specifically the use of only 1 benefit but all the possible harms, many of which failed to reach statistical significance. This, he said, "creates an overly negative perspective on the impact of statins." That said, Dr Pencina noted that evidence for both harms and benefits of statins beyond CVD is hard to come by, highlighting a recent review of meta-analyses published in the Annals that failed to find convincing evidence of an association between statins and more than 250 unique non-CVD outcomes.[4] Suggestive associations with statin use were found only for incident diabetes and myopathy. Dr Puhan countered that it is important to be inclusive of potential harms because, in general, these harms tend to be underestimated. They included cancer, for example, because this is a concern for some patients. "Cancer has a risk ratio of 1.01, so this doesn't have an effect on the overall benefit-harm balance," Dr Puhan said. But "it's better than eliminating outcomes beforehand because then no one knows what the impact was. So I think it's good to be explicit about that." Dr Pencina also pointed out that the population preferences used in the study are based on a prior Swiss and Ethiopian survey conducted by the authors. Although these patients may be less willing, for example, to deal with myalgia to avoid CVD, the same may not be true for Americans. "What we learned is that it's worthwhile to try to quantify the benefit versus the risks, but I do have a hard time reading this study and thinking, 'Oh, the guidelines have it wrong; the risk at which statins should be given is too low, it should be higher,'" Dr Pencina said. "So in that sense, I see this study as discussion generating. We need to sit down and start thinking about quantifying these things in a more rigorous way than we have done today." Sensitivity analyses performed for the United States and United Kingdom showed similar results, noted Dr Puhan, who also agreed that explicit methods are needed to determine risks, which will depend to some extent on the individual country. He noted that there are more than 300 prediction models for CVD around the world, but that they did not make any recommendation for a particular model. "The bottom line is that we shouldn't be that naive to think that 1 result applies to the entire world," he said. "So each country should probably consider what the risks are, determine risk thresholds accordingly, and then make recommendations accordingly." In an accompanying editorial, Ilana Richman, MD, and Joseph S. Ross, MD, MHS, both from Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, write that the methodology used in the analysis is "much more elaborate" than the calculus used in either the USPSTF or American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, and importantly, incorporates the competing risk for death.[5] "The effect of this approach was immediately apparent: within every CVD risk stratum, as age increased, the probability of net benefit from statin therapy decreased, reflecting both competing mortality and age-related risk for adverse events," they write. "The results paint a nuanced -- if less optimistic -- picture of the net benefits of statins, particularly in older adults who may not live long enough to benefit." Whether the inclusion of such a wide range of adverse events was justified is sure to be debated by both sides of the statin debate. The editorialists conclude, however, that patient preferences must play a role in statin initiation, and that "the onus is on physicians to fairly summarize the evidence and guide patients through the decision-making process." Dr Bibbins-Domingo reiterated this point: "It's important to remember that we are talking about statins for primary prevention, a pill patients take daily when they don't have signs or symptoms of disease to avoid something bad happening in the future. For any given patient, it's important that we are able to give them our best understanding of the likelihood that they will benefit and the likelihood that they will experience some harms." She added, "It's also important to listen to patients to understand how they value these potential benefits and harms, how risk averse they are in each of these domains, and even whether taking a daily pill for prevention itself poses a burden
  15. STENDEC

    Making An Oral Suspension

    Your cabergoline is insoluble in water but is soluble in ethanol. So your first stop is going to be a liquor store to get yourself the strongest white liquor you can put your hands on...probably Everclear or Bacardi 151 unless you live someplace where they sell Everclear 190 proof. You will also need a dark-colored glass bottle that can hold at least 100ml with a calibrated 1ml dropper like these. Next you are going to need an accurate scale so that you can measure out exactly 25mg of your cabergoline powder. The next step is to mix this in 100ml of 190 proof Everclear and voila, you will now have a 0.25mg/ml oral solution, or at least one that is very close to that because your solvent is 95% ethanol....if you can't get your hands on Everclear 190 and have to use 151, I'll need a little help from the chemists in the house to understand what, if any, impact using a solvent that is only 75% ethanol will have... You could also make a suspension out of something thick like glycerin. The caber won't dissolve but if you again mix 25mg of caber in 100ml of glycerin and shake the heck out of it to ensure that the caber is uniformly distributed before you use it, 1ml should contain approximately 0.25mg of caber.
  16. STENDEC

    Tren is a SARM

    Hah....this is genius. I can't even recall thinking this but for something lipophyllic, this would work really well.
  17. STENDEC

    Tren is a SARM

    I suppose it should really come as no surprise that many AAS are actually SARMs...after all, this is what researchers were looking for when they developed them...an improved anabolic:androgenic ratio. However, redefining AAS as SARMs may allow a resumption of research into their use as HRT agents for aging adults. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Apr;300(4):E650-60. Epub 2011 Jan 25. 17β-Hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (trenbolone) exhibits tissue selective anabolic activity: effects on muscle, bone, adiposity, hemoglobin, and prostate. Yarrow JF, Conover CF, McCoy SC, Lipinska JA, Santillana CA, Hance JM, Cannady DF, VanPelt TD, Sanchez J, Conrad BP, Pingel JE, Wronski TJ, Borst SE. Source VA Medical Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32608-1197, USA. jfyarrow@ufl.edu Abstract Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) now under development can protect against muscle and bone loss without causing prostate growth or polycythemia. 17β-Hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (trenbolone), a potent testosterone analog, may have SARM-like actions because, unlike testosterone, trenbolone does not undergo tissue-specific 5α-reduction to form more potent androgens. We tested the hypothesis that trenbolone-enanthate (TREN) might prevent orchiectomy-induced losses in muscle and bone and visceral fat accumulation without increasing prostate mass or resulting in adverse hemoglobin elevations. Male F344 rats aged 3 mo underwent orchiectomy or remained intact and were administered graded doses of TREN, supraphysiological testosterone-enanthate, or vehicle for 29 days. In both intact and orchiectomized animals, all TREN doses and supraphysiological testosterone-enanthate augmented androgen-sensitive levator ani/bulbocavernosus muscle mass by 35-40% above shams (P ≤ 0.001) and produced a dose-dependent partial protection against orchiectomy-induced total and trabecular bone mineral density losses (P http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/300/4/E650.long
  18. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    I shall ponder these things in my heart Michael.
  19. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    Legs Goblet Squats, Weighted Step Ups, Weighted Walking Lunges, GHR Had to do a short leg day as work got in the way of my workout, dammit...and for some reason my left trap is on fire today.
  20. STENDEC

    Mr.Kite is doing 5/3/1

    You can also put your toes up on a plate for a little better hammy stretch/involvement on the GM
  21. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    Chest Flat bench, Low/Mid/High Cable Flyes, Single Arm Crossovers, Incline Close DB Press, Plate Press
  22. STENDEC

    Occult Blooded Occlusion Grimoire

    I suppose it's possible that occlusion might work like the old MAST system that was used in EMS....basically inflatable pants that artificially raised a patient's BP...
  23. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    Shoulders Power HIIT, OHP to 185x1, Front/Lateral Raises, Cable Pullaparts, PNF Crossovers, DB Shrugs, Plate Raises
  24. STENDEC

    One (New) Direction

    Back & Bis Deads, Scott Curls, KB Good Mornings, Bowler Curls, Rope Curls More noob instruction today on the finer points of the King of Lifts
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