Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JudoJosh

Proven Non-Hormonal Exercise Performance Boosting Agents

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, STENDEC said:

Neither have I but it performs reliably as an ergogenic in study after study.

The stuff works.

 

With a carnitine and caffeine the stuff is awesome. 

 

GW may give you cancer but it beats citr malate in my exp for endurance. I didnt see much fat loss but my HDL became good for the first time lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Int J Sports Med. 1988 Oct;9(5):301-5.
Effect of L-tryptophan supplementation on exercise performance.
Segura R1, Ventura JL.

The performance of strenuous physical exercise is associated with discomfort and pain, the tolerance for that being modulated by the activity of the endogenous opioid systems. As 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) affects nociception through its effects on the enkephalin-endorphin system, we have analyzed the effects of a moderate supplementation with L-tryptophan, the immediate precursor of 5-HT, on endurance and sensation of effort. Twelve healthy sportsmen were subjected to a work load corresponding to 80% of their maximal oxygen uptake on two separate trials, after receiving a placebo and after receiving the same amount of L-tryptophan. The subjects ran on a treadmill until exhaustion. Total exercise time, perceived exertion rate, maximum heart rate, peak oxygen consumption, pulse recovery rate, and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption were determined during the two trials. The total exercise time was 49.4% greater after receiving L-tryptophan than after receiving the placebo. A lower rate of perceived exertion was exhibited by the group while on tryptophan although the differences from the control group were not statistically significant. No differences were observed in the other parameters between the two trials. The longer exercise time als well at the total work load performed could be due to an increased pain tolerance as a result of L-tryptophan ingestion.

 

PMID: 3246461

 

 

Int J Neurosci. 2010 May;120(5):319-27. doi: 10.3109/00207450903389404.
L-tryptophan supplementation can decrease fatigue perception during an aerobic exercise with supramaximal intercalated anaerobic bouts in young healthy men.
Javierre C1, Segura R, Ventura JL, Suárez A, Rosés JM.

Physical exercise is often terminated not due to muscle fatigue but because of inadequate neural drive in the serotonergic system. Modifications in activity levels of the serotonergic system, induced by variations in the availability of L-tryptophan (a serotonin precursor) may alter neural drive. We examined the effect of L-tryptophan supplementation on physical performance by combining aerobic work with brief periods of supramaximal intensity that closely mimics the activity typical of team sports. Twenty healthy young sportsmen (mean age 21.2 +/- 0.7 years) performed a submaximal exercise on a cycle ergometer, with a workload corresponding to 50% of their respective VO(2) max for 10 min, followed by a maximal intensity exercise for 30 s. This sequence was repeated three times and, after the fourth series, each participant continued to exercise at the highest speed that he could sustain for 20 min. This protocol was performed twice: once with and finally without supplementation of L-tryptophan, in random order and double-blind. Peak power output, average anaerobic power output, and power output during the last 20 min of the trial were higher on the trials performed with L-tryptophan supplementation than on those performed with placebo. The distance covered during the last 20 min of the trial was 11,959 +/- 1,753 m on placebo and 12,526 +/- 1,617 m on L-tryptophan (p < .05). In conclusion, in some types of exercises, modification of the serotonergic system may improve the physical performance.

 

PMID: 20402569 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting...

 

In the first study, my totally untrained eye sees a pattern: Certain people derived a huge benefit, some only a tiny benefit, and others reverse benefit. I'm guessing that people's serotonin systems can vary greatly, so if the serotogenic system impacts the exercise performance, then this makes some sense. The cardiac function and recovery didn't differ between groups, either. 

 

https://sci-hub.tw/10.1055/s-2007-1025027

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/31/2018 at 2:32 AM, STENDEC said:

 

Int J Sports Med. 1988 Oct;9(5):301-5.
Effect of L-tryptophan supplementation on exercise performance.
Segura R1, Ventura JL.

The performance of strenuous physical exercise is associated with discomfort and pain, the tolerance for that being modulated by the activity of the endogenous opioid systems. As 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) affects nociception through its effects on the enkephalin-endorphin system, we have analyzed the effects of a moderate supplementation with L-tryptophan, the immediate precursor of 5-HT, on endurance and sensation of effort. Twelve healthy sportsmen were subjected to a work load corresponding to 80% of their maximal oxygen uptake on two separate trials, after receiving a placebo and after receiving the same amount of L-tryptophan. The subjects ran on a treadmill until exhaustion. Total exercise time, perceived exertion rate, maximum heart rate, peak oxygen consumption, pulse recovery rate, and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption were determined during the two trials. The total exercise time was 49.4% greater after receiving L-tryptophan than after receiving the placebo. A lower rate of perceived exertion was exhibited by the group while on tryptophan although the differences from the control group were not statistically significant. No differences were observed in the other parameters between the two trials. The longer exercise time als well at the total work load performed could be due to an increased pain tolerance as a result of L-tryptophan ingestion.

 

PMID: 3246461

 

 

Int J Neurosci. 2010 May;120(5):319-27. doi: 10.3109/00207450903389404.
L-tryptophan supplementation can decrease fatigue perception during an aerobic exercise with supramaximal intercalated anaerobic bouts in young healthy men.
Javierre C1, Segura R, Ventura JL, Suárez A, Rosés JM.

Physical exercise is often terminated not due to muscle fatigue but because of inadequate neural drive in the serotonergic system. Modifications in activity levels of the serotonergic system, induced by variations in the availability of L-tryptophan (a serotonin precursor) may alter neural drive. We examined the effect of L-tryptophan supplementation on physical performance by combining aerobic work with brief periods of supramaximal intensity that closely mimics the activity typical of team sports. Twenty healthy young sportsmen (mean age 21.2 +/- 0.7 years) performed a submaximal exercise on a cycle ergometer, with a workload corresponding to 50% of their respective VO(2) max for 10 min, followed by a maximal intensity exercise for 30 s. This sequence was repeated three times and, after the fourth series, each participant continued to exercise at the highest speed that he could sustain for 20 min. This protocol was performed twice: once with and finally without supplementation of L-tryptophan, in random order and double-blind. Peak power output, average anaerobic power output, and power output during the last 20 min of the trial were higher on the trials performed with L-tryptophan supplementation than on those performed with placebo. The distance covered during the last 20 min of the trial was 11,959 +/- 1,753 m on placebo and 12,526 +/- 1,617 m on L-tryptophan (p < .05). In conclusion, in some types of exercises, modification of the serotonergic system may improve the physical performance.

 

PMID: 20402569 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A couple more tryptophan studies:

 

The Effect of Tryptophan on Social Interaction in Everyday Life: A Placebo-Controlled Study

https://doi.org/10.1016/S0893-133X(01)00219-6

 

Translated by ergo-log as: Supplement with tryptophan makes you more dominant

 

Acute administration of nutritionally sourced tryptophan increases fear recognition

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00213-003-1479-x

 

(Translated in Ergo-log as:

 

Tryptophan supplementation increases emotional intelligence)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×