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What did you cook today?

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Ok, I wanted to start this thread because Oz, Kim and I seem to repeatedly hijack unrelated threads with what we've cooked that day. Basically, the idea is to say what you've cooked, provide a pic if possible (a la JJ's example or Kim's excellent albums) and provide recipe if people are interested.

 

So, today, breakfast was:

 

12 grain cereal with cassia pods and scratch butterscotch

Dehydrated sweet potatoes with a scratch coriander, lime and sambal oelek mayo

Hemp protein + blackberry, blueberry and black cherry smoothie with almond milk

Kale and spinach salad with roasted goat cheese, wildflower honey and malt vinegar + coconut oil flash fried leak strands

Peony white needle tea with lime rind, chili and maple syrup

 

Lunch was prepared by the missus.

 

Supper will be...scraps salvaged from breakfast!

 

The rest of the breakfast salad. Butter chicken on a bed of peony white needle tea infused kamut with corn and edamame. I'll see how this looks and if it's photogenic enough to warrant a picture.

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Thanks for the kind word about my albums. That breakfast sounds killer. The sweet potatoes sound intriguing, how did you dehydrate them?

 

I'm copying this over from the other thread, with some additions. My favorite way to cook up a tough piece of meat:

 

First dice up some carrot, celery and onion (miripoix). Season the beef on all sides with salt and course pepper. Sear the beef on high in some fat (bacon fat works great) til it's nice and brown. Turn the heat down a bit, then add your miripoix, season with S&P, and cook til it's sweated (tender). Crank back up to high, add red wine and/or beef stock, and scrape the bottom of the pot up with a wooden spoon to get all the tasty brown bits. Cut a head of garlic in half width-wise (don't both remove the peel) and toss that in. Plop your beef back on top of everything (should be at least halfway submerged), cover, and pop in the oven at 300 for a few hours*.

 

When you're ready to eat, remove the piece of beef, then pour the contents of the pot (the veggies you put in earlier plus liquid) into a blender. Blend that up, then strain. Now you have gravy without having to thicken it using a roux. You can pour this back into the pot and then put your beef in it 'til you're ready to serve.

 

*The best thing I've found for this is a dutch oven, but you can use any old pot with metal handles, and if you don't have an appropriate lid you can just tent it with aluminum foil. Crock pots work very well for this too.

 

Here are some beef shanks I prepared this way, along with some roast potatoes and broccolini. The beef was cooked @ 300F for about 3 hours.

 

531000_10151460770565697_710085696_23334072_122835128_n.jpg

 

This recipe is fairly basic. I will often add some soy sauce and a touch of molasses to my braising liquids to punch umami and general flavor up a bit. I will also often add herbs - a parsley bundle, a bundle of thyme, and/or bay leaf - as well.

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The mister and I were talking last night about how we're so boring in our food and cooking habits. We're thinking of starting a dinner club with a few friends. The idea would be that the meals would be healthy yet delicious (ideally lol), and that the location would likely revolve (or not - we're east and no one cool likes going east), and that the responsibility for planning the meal would rotate. However the cost and work of each meal would be shared by everyone each time. People would gather early, having each provided the items they were "assigned" by the meal planner. Everyone would drink some wine and help with prep. Then drink more wine, and eat! Then drink more wine, go home and pass out.

 

If this actually ends up happening I'll definitely be mining this thread for ideas.

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That sounds like a great idea. One question, though - would everyone share the same idea of what "healthy" is?

 

I think people have this notion that eating healthy food doesn't allow you to be creative when you cook. On the contrary, not only have I found that a good knowledge of cooking allows me to make healthy food tasty, it challenges me to come up with new ideas for old things. I think it's fun.

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I totally agree with your interpretation.

 

The couple we have in mind to start with are both members of our gym, awesomely fit, professional, and one is apparently an awesome cook. Plus they live in a really central location, which really helps - and we haven't really socialized yet but there's been talk of setting something up so we think it's pretty promising lol!

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I wish I had seen this before finishing, but we (the kids and I) made fresh spring rolls with shrimp. The rice wraps come in circular sheets. There aren't many rules, but in general you want to include a chopped protein cooked ingredient, a crunchy colorful vegetable, cooked rice noodles, lettuce and mint or basil.

Once you have your assembly line ready, with a damp paper towel over a cutting board to receive the wraps, proceed to soften one wrap at a time in shallow pan with hot water.

Extend the softened over the paper towel and extent the ingredients around the middle. Fold the bottom over the filling, then fold the sides inward and finally roll upwards.

It will take you a couple of tries to figure out how much is enough filling.

 

I use a mix of different sauces to dip in, if you have an Asian market nearby, there is actually "spring roll sauce", sweet and spicy. I also make a concoction of that's sauce with some fish sauce ( Vietnamese ), natural chunky peanut butter and some sriracha sauce.

 

Sounds more complicates than it is, but it is so good

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I wish I had seen this before finishing, but we (the kids and I) made fresh spring rolls with shrimp. The rice wraps come in circular sheets. There aren't many rules, but in general you want to include a chopped protein cooked ingredient, a crunchy colorful vegetable, cooked rice noodles, lettuce and mint or basil.

Once you have your assembly line ready, with a damp paper towel over a cutting board to receive the wraps, proceed to soften one wrap at a time in shallow pan with hot water.

Extend the softened over the paper towel and extent the ingredients around the middle. Fold the bottom over the filling, then fold the sides inward and finally roll upwards.

It will take you a couple of tries to figure out how much is enough filling.

 

I use a mix of different sauces to dip in, if you have an Asian market nearby, there is actually "spring roll sauce", sweet and spicy. I also make a concoction of that's sauce with some fish sauce ( Vietnamese ), natural chunky peanut butter and some sriracha sauce.

 

Sounds more complicates than it is, but it is so good

 

Oh man, these are fantastic. Lara made some of these one night. It's cool too that your whole family gets into it.

 

I ate Blue Bell ice cream.

Lazy day.

 

But tomorrow morning I'm going to try hunting for morels. If that is successful, dinner should be quite tasty.

 

Nice!!

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We're having rack of lamb tonight. I just made a paste out of kalamata olives, preserved meyer lemon, pickled cherry peppers, parsley, coriander seed, cinnamon, and olive oil. I cut some slits into the rack, pushed the paste into these, then rubbed the rest on the outside. It's in the fridge resting now.

 

The preserved lemon is pretty easy to make. In a mortar and pestal, bust up some cinnamon, clove, chiles, coriander seed and bay leaf. Mix that with a few cups of salt. Pour a base layer of this into an air tight container, then start packing lemon quarters into this as tightly as you can, covering each layer with some additional salt. Enough juice should come out of the lemons so that the salt and juice mixture covers everything once the jar is almost full (leave an inch towards the top) - if there isn't enough juice, add some lemon juice to cover. Stash this in your pantry for a month.

 

400858_10151165968865697_710085696_22299133_121067843_n.jpg

 

The pickled chiles are easy too. I use 2c of rice wine vinegar and 1c water, with 1 heaping tbsp of sugar and whatever spices you want (I use a pickling spice mix I pick up at the farmer's market). Cut a small slit into the bottom of the peppers, then pack the peppers into an airtight jar (leave about an inch towards the top). Bring the vinegar mixture to a boil, then pour the boiling mixture into the jar (it should cover the peppers). Seal the container up and pop it into your fridge - it should be ready in a week.

 

551427_10151474759250697_710085696_23386685_450466389_n.jpg

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hGTJgl.jpg

 

The meat wasn't as even as I would have liked, mostly because my grill cut out on me while it was cooking. So I had to finish it in the oven. Still tasty though.

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Haha nice' date=' what are you putting in it?[/quote']

 

Ummm... Cream cheese ;)

 

Filling

2 lbs cream cheese

4 whole eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tbsp cinnamon

1/2 cup sugar free vanilla almond milk

1 cup splenda

 

Crust

1cup ground almond meal

(Maybe some ground pecans for a lil flavor?)

1/3 cup splenda

1/4 cup melted butter

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Easter Pie!

 

  • I used half a can of pumpkin puree and one red sweet potato.

  • Half a can light coconut milk.

  • 30g of ON 100% Whey Rocky Road (didn't have my vanilla Trutein on hand, but it turned out not to make a difference taste wise).
  • Pumpkin Spice (Nutmeg, Ginger, All Spice, Cloves)

  • Cinnamin
  • I was forced to use Stevia, however 10-15 packs of Splenda would have been better.

 

To Prepare, first freeze the pumpkin and the sweet potato. Then add the frozen contents to a food processor along with the protein powder and half a can of coconut milk. Blend the shit out of it for a few minutes and it will fluff up nicely. Add in your spices (I overdid the Pumpkin Spice, I guess there is a such a thing as too much of a good thing), Splenda and Cinnamon.

 

The consistency should be nearly identical to pumpkin pie mix.

 

For the crust my sister whipped up something with ground Oats that came out okay, I can't recall the exact recipe but it was healthy. You can let it sit in the freezer for a bit to harden back up if you like.

 

I topped it with candied almonds and dried cranberries.

 

Overall it came out pretty damned good. The Stevia sucked though which was compounded by the overwhelming Pumpkin Spice. I added some Waldon Farms Zero-Calorie Maple Syrup (Splenda sweetened) and that made it an absolute delight.

 

DSC02020.jpg

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So, today, breakfast was:

 

12 grain cereal with cassia pods and scratch butterscotch

Dehydrated sweet potatoes with a scratch coriander, lime and sambal oelek mayo

Hemp protein + blackberry, blueberry and black cherry smoothie with almond milk

Kale and spinach salad with roasted goat cheese, wildflower honey and malt vinegar + coconut oil flash fried leak strands

Peony white needle tea with lime rind, chili and maple syrup

 

That sounds a lot better than what I had for breakfast... left over hamburger meat nuked with egg whites in the microwave at work, dashed with seasoning salt and smothered with "wing sauce." =/

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[MENTION=19]D-termine[/MENTION], that pie looks great! I am wondering if maybe I could make a key lime pie with an almond crust.

 

[MENTION=17]Supnut[/MENTION], how does avocado work for cooking? I've never used it before.

 

I think I'm going to take a shot at making my own cultured butter. The process is pretty simple, and apparently the flavor is amazing.

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No sauce.. Home made seasoning and lots of butter

 

Seasoning was:

 

2 parts garlic powder

2 parts chili powder

2 parts smoked paprika or regular paprika or mixed

1 part cayenne pepper

1 part salt.

 

Replace part with cup, tbsp, tsp, whatever you want but thats the ratio of the seasoning.

 

The guac was just avocado mashed together with some guac seasoning packet I had

 

Season wings raw (roll them around in seasoning mix), place on cookie sheet lined with foil and then I melted a couple tbsp of butter (3 i think) and drizzled it over the wings and then i sliced little pieces of butter and put them on the sheet in between a couple wings (butter makes everything delicious!!) and I like to sprinkle more seasoning over top so when the butter melts it sorts of cooks in the butter and seasoning and gives it more flavor IMO, and then pop in over on broil for about 15 mins or so and then flip wings with tongs and back in oven for about 25 mins or till theyare crispy enough to your liking.

 

It is very tasty

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[MENTION=19]D-termine[/MENTION], that pie looks great! I am wondering if maybe I could make a key lime pie with an almond crust.

 

[MENTION=17]Supnut[/MENTION], how does avocado work for cooking? I've never used it before.

 

I think I'm going to take a shot at making my own cultured butter. The process is pretty simple, and apparently the flavor is amazing.

 

I don't notice much in the way of flavor beyond a generic oil taste but I can turn the stove up one more notch at least before it starts to smoke like crazy so you get a fantastic sear with it. The meat still smokes like crazy as it renders so that's a bit annoying but by then its done anyway if it came out of a water bath and its just getting seared.

 

I've tried to make cultured butter twice and never noticed any difference.

 

I've ate most of my stick of Plugra cultured butter this week and was able to do a side by side with plain unsalted Lank O Lakes. Definitely a better flavor with a distinct twang that made the L 'o' lakes taste pretty boring by comparison.

 

I had a cooks catalog the other day with a butter pig shaped more like a stick of butter so you don't have to pack the mess in there as much. I may get one for Plugra just for putting on things and save the other for cooking.

 

I imagine the Plugra would go great on a baked potato. No need for sour cream.

 

 

 

Today was a butterflied pork chop bagged with hoisen sauce sauce and served with leftover roasted okra and sauerkraut.

 

 

I have a plantain that's FINALLY starting to turn yellow I'm looking forward to using in the next week or so.

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Supnut, I just realized that we've been using Plugra all this time. I never bothered reading the label - just always grabbed the "butter in the red wrapper". It is good stuff.

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