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Intermittent fasting - diet approach


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Well, this sucks. Probably won't be an issue until I'm much leaner, but I guess I should eventually switch from Xtend in the AM to regular old BCAA.   Am J Physiol. 1986 Mar;250(3 Pt 1):E24

A different take on IF   This study compared a 30% ER diet for two weeks followed by an "energy balanced" diet for two weeks, etc. against a straight 30% ER continuous diet.   The

Well, seven years later and I still believe this. I've restarted 5:2 IF and I feel great. It is the ideal form of diet for me because it is completely binary and the "rules" are stupidly simple. I alw

Another study on meal frequency as related to the topic of skipping breakfast and IF - thanks to Niflheim.

 

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=879792

 

somewhat poor and old; I suggest anyone wanting some updated (and sport-specific info) check out this one

 

International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: meal frequency

 

Paul M La Bounty1*, Bill I Campbell2, Jacob Wilson3, Elfego Galvan4, John Berardi5, Susan M Kleiner6, Richard B Kreider7, Jeffrey R Stout8, Tim Ziegenfuss9, Marie Spano10, Abbie Smith8 and Jose Antonio11

 

Position Statement: Admittedly, research to date examining the physiological effects of meal frequency in humans is somewhat limited. More specifically, data that has specifically examined the impact of meal frequency on body composition, training adaptations, and performance in physically active individuals and athletes is scant. Until more research is available in the physically active and athletic populations, definitive conclusions cannot be made. However, within the confines of the current scientific literature, we assert that:

 

1. Increasing meal frequency does not appear to favorably change body composition in sedentary populations.

 

2. If protein levels are adequate, increasing meal frequency during periods of hypoenergetic dieting may preserve lean body mass in athletic populations.

 

3. Increased meal frequency appears to have a positive effect on various blood markers of health, particularly LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and insulin.

 

4. Increased meal frequency does not appear to significantly enhance diet induced thermogenesis, total energy expenditure or resting metabolic rate.

 

5. Increasing meal frequency appears to help decrease hunger and improve appetite control.

 

The following literature review has been prepared by the authors in support of the aforementioned position statement.

 

free full-text > http://www.jissn.com/content/8/1/4/

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somewhat poor and old; I suggest anyone wanting some updated (and sport-specific info) check out this one

 

 

free full-text > http://www.jissn.com/content/8/1/4/

 

Physicus007: what is your position or thoughts on implementing IF from 9pm to 12 noon the next day to enhance fat loss when dieting and/or overall body composition even when not dieting? Do you think missing that breakfast meal matters much?

 

 

Sent from my EVO 3D using Tapatalk 2

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Physicus007: what is your position or thoughts on implementing IF from 9pm to 12 noon the next day to enhance fat loss when dieting and/or overall body composition even when not dieting? Do you think missing that breakfast meal matters much?

 

 

Sent from my EVO 3D using Tapatalk 2

if you thusly miss energy, or as most people would say "calories", yes it will - it's pretty easy to eat without hunger -20% with just skipping breakfast.

 

whether that works does at least in my humble opinion however depend on an intact metabolism.

 

if skipping breakfast leads to binges later in the day, on the other hand it may even compromise your physique

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  • 3 months later...

They did give good advice, which is partly why I find their videos to be so ridiculous. In most of their videos, you can find a couple things that are good advice or at least make some type of sense. The problem is that it's normally sandwiched between 4-6 minutes of bullshit and epic douchebaggery. Then again with this video I don't know if "if you're curious about something, try it out and make up your own mind and don't be swayed by random assholes on the internet" can really be called advice. It's more like "hey, this is how normal people make decisions".

 

The first time I watched one of their videos, I thought it was one guy with excellent video editing skills who had a wicked case of schizophrenia and tourette's syndrome.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 4 years later...

A different take on IF

 

This study compared a 30% ER diet for two weeks followed by an "energy balanced" diet for two weeks, etc. against a straight 30% ER continuous diet.

 

The zig-zag diet resulted in significantly more weight loss and perhaps the most impressive thing, did a better job of preventing regain after the diet intervention was finished.

 

Lay press article:

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/09/19/two-week-two-week-diet-key-losing-weight-study-finds/

 

Actual journal article:

 

https://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ijo2017206a.html?foxtrotcallback=true

 

Check out figure 4

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

Well, this sucks. Probably won't be an issue until I'm much leaner, but I guess I should eventually switch from Xtend in the AM to regular old BCAA.

 

Am J Physiol. 1986 Mar;250(3 Pt 1):E248-52.
Glutamine blocks lipolysis and ketogenesis of fasting.
Cersosimo E, Williams P, Hoxworth B, Lacy W, Abumrad N.
Abstract

Several in vivo studies have indirectly suggested a relationship between blood glutamine and ketonemia. The present study was designed to characterize the role glutamine plays in regulating lipolysis and ketogenesis during fasting in vivo. Twelve dogs had catheters implanted in the hepatic and portal veins (V) and in the femoral artery (A) 17-21 days before study. The animals were fasted for 4 days. After a 120-min rest and 40-min basal periods, 6 dogs received an infusion of L-glutamine at 6 mumol X kg-1 X min-1 and 6 received saline and acted as controls. Hepatic and splanchnic balances (mumol X kg-1 X min-1) were estimated by A-V differences multiplied by blood flow determined by indocyanine green. Fasting was associated with a compensated (no change in pH) mild metabolic acidosis but no change in plasma insulin and glucagon or blood glutamine. L-Glutamine infusion increased blood glutamine by 20% but decreased arterial free fatty acids (FFA, from 1,054 +/- 47 to 850 +/- 43 mumol/l, P less than 0.01), beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB, from 136 +/- 15 to 66 +/- 8 mumol/l, P less than 0.01), acetoacetate (AcAc, from 168 +/- 26 to 86 +/- 21 mumol/l, P less than 0.01), and glycerol (from 90 +/- 4 to 65 +/- 5 mumol/l, P less than 0.01). It also decreased hepatic uptake of glycerol (from 2.5 +/- 0.5 to 0.8 +/- 0.3 mumol X kg-1 X min-1, P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
    3513612

 

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9 hours ago, Kimbo said:

Well, this sucks. Probably won't be an issue until I'm much leaner, but I guess I should eventually switch from Xtend in the AM to regular old BCAA.

 

Am J Physiol. 1986 Mar;250(3 Pt 1):E248-52.
Glutamine blocks lipolysis and ketogenesis of fasting.
Cersosimo E, Williams P, Hoxworth B, Lacy W, Abumrad N.
Abstract

Several in vivo studies have indirectly suggested a relationship between blood glutamine and ketonemia. The present study was designed to characterize the role glutamine plays in regulating lipolysis and ketogenesis during fasting in vivo. Twelve dogs had catheters implanted in the hepatic and portal veins (V) and in the femoral artery (A) 17-21 days before study. The animals were fasted for 4 days. After a 120-min rest and 40-min basal periods, 6 dogs received an infusion of L-glutamine at 6 mumol X kg-1 X min-1 and 6 received saline and acted as controls. Hepatic and splanchnic balances (mumol X kg-1 X min-1) were estimated by A-V differences multiplied by blood flow determined by indocyanine green. Fasting was associated with a compensated (no change in pH) mild metabolic acidosis but no change in plasma insulin and glucagon or blood glutamine. L-Glutamine infusion increased blood glutamine by 20% but decreased arterial free fatty acids (FFA, from 1,054 +/- 47 to 850 +/- 43 mumol/l, P less than 0.01), beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-OHB, from 136 +/- 15 to 66 +/- 8 mumol/l, P less than 0.01), acetoacetate (AcAc, from 168 +/- 26 to 86 +/- 21 mumol/l, P less than 0.01), and glycerol (from 90 +/- 4 to 65 +/- 5 mumol/l, P less than 0.01). It also decreased hepatic uptake of glycerol (from 2.5 +/- 0.5 to 0.8 +/- 0.3 mumol X kg-1 X min-1, P less than 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
    3513612

 

.

 

 

great info !

 

 

.

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  • 7 months later...

Daily fasting works for weight loss, finds report on 16:8 diet
Science Daily
June 18, 2018

     
Daily fasting is an effective tool to reduce weight and lower blood pressure, according to a new study published by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers in the journal Nutrition and Healthy Aging.

 

The study is the first to examine the effect of time-restricted eating -- a form of fasting that limits food consumption to select hours each day -- on weight loss in obese individuals.

To study the effect of this type of diet, researchers worked with 23 obese volunteers who had an average age of 45 and average body mass index, or BMI, of 35.

Between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. the dieters could eat any type and quantity of food they desired, but for the remaining 16 hours they could only drink water or calorie-free beverages. The study followed the participants for 12 weeks.

 

When compared to a matched historical control group from a previous weight loss trial on a different type of fasting, the researchers found that those who followed the time-restricted eating diet consumed fewer calories, lost weight and had improvements in blood pressure. On average, participants consumed about 350 fewer calories, lost about 3 percent of their body weight and saw their systolic blood pressure decreased by about 7 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg), the standard measure of blood pressure. All other measures, including fat mass, insulin resistance and cholesterol, were similar to the control group.

 

"The take-home message from this study is that there are options for weight loss that do not include calorie counting or eliminating certain foods," said Krista Varady, associate professor of kinesiology and nutrition in the UIC College of Applied Health Sciences and corresponding author on the study.

While this is the first study to look at the 16:8 diet, named for its 16 hours of fasting and its 8 hours of "feasting," Varady says that the results align with previous research on other types of intermittent fasting diets.

 

"The results we saw in this study are similar to the results we've seen in other studies on alternate day fasting, another type of diet," Varady said, "but one of the benefits of the 16:8 diet may be that it is easier for people to maintain. We observed that fewer participants dropped out of this study when compared to studies on other fasting diets."

Varady says that while the research indicates daily fasting works for weight loss, there have not yet been studies to determine if it works better than other diets, although the researchers observed the weight loss to be slightly less than what has been observed in other intermittent fasting diet studies.

 

"These preliminary data offer promise for the use of time-restricted feeding as a weight loss technique in obese adults, but longer-term, large-scale randomized controlled trials [are required]," Varady and her colleagues write. "The 16:8 diet is another tool for weight loss that we now have preliminary scientific evidence to support," Varady said. "When it comes to weight loss, people need to find what works for them because even small amounts of success can lead to improvements in metabolic health."

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than one-third of adults in the U.S. have obesity, which greatly increases the risk of metabolic diseases such as coronary heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, and that obesity is most prevalent among non-Hispanic black individuals and middle-age adults.

 

Journal Reference:

Kelsey Gabel, Kristin K. Hoddy, Nicole Haggerty, Jeehee Song, Cynthia M. Kroeger, John F. Trepanowski, Satchidananda Panda, Krista A. Varady. Effects of 8-hour time restricted feeding on body weight and metabolic disease risk factors in obese adults: A pilot study. Nutrition and Healthy Aging, 2018; 4 (4): 345 DOI: 10.3233/NHA-170036
 

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  • 1 year later...
On 7/12/2012 at 5:51 AM, STENDEC said:

my own take on it is that IF is probably one of the most effective ways to reduce overall caloric intake and probably gives you the most bang for your buck in terms of the positive metabolic effects of energy restriction. It also allows you to largely consume what you want to satiation when you are not fasting...

 

Well, seven years later and I still believe this. I've restarted 5:2 IF and I feel great. It is the ideal form of diet for me because it is completely binary and the "rules" are stupidly simple. I always forget about the slight euphoria IF induces until I've started doing it again. Feels really good.

 

Two days a week I am consuming <500kcal and almost all of it in the form of protein drinks along with some nuts. I did find some high-protein cup-o-soup designed for gastric bypass patients that is pretty good and permits me to have a little something that seems like it has some substance....15g of PRO and about 90kcal for the cup.

 

It is a little spendy however so I've been toying with the idea of reproducing it using bone broth and traditional Lipton cup-o-soup.

 

I'd like to drop about 15lbs over the next 6-8 weeks....so we'll see what happens.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 11/12/2019 at 2:53 AM, STENDEC said:

 

Well, seven years later and I still believe this. I've restarted 5:2 IF and I feel great. It is the ideal form of diet for me because it is completely binary and the "rules" are stupidly simple. I always forget about the slight euphoria IF induces until I've started doing it again. Feels really good.

 

Two days a week I am consuming <500kcal and almost all of it in the form of protein drinks along with some nuts. I did find some high-protein cup-o-soup designed for gastric bypass patients that is pretty good and permits me to have a little something that seems like it has some substance....15g of PRO and about 90kcal for the cup.

 

It is a little spendy however so I've been toying with the idea of reproducing it using bone broth and traditional Lipton cup-o-soup.

 

I'd like to drop about 15lbs over the next 6-8 weeks....so we'll see what happens.

 

Check out Kettle and Fire's Bone Broth Chili

 

Their bone broth soups are also amazing.  The Miso and Turmeric Ginger soups are on point.

Grass-Fed Beef Chili (Made With Bone Broth)-Soups-Kettle & Fire

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  • 9 months later...
20 hours ago, STENDEC said:

 

Funny how I have exactly the same goal a year later. 🙄

 

And I think my post at the top of this page is appropo:

 

On 7/13/2012 at 6:34 PM, Emperor G_D said:

And what happened to your intentions?

 

:D

 

For my part, IF and lowcarb/lazy mostly keto has been a godsend. When I slip on the keto part, the IF part helps me not to lose ground on my continued weightloss.

 

Observations:

 

- I can transition into 18-20 hr fasts after a few days of 16 hr fasts fairly easily

- Too many 18+hr fasts leads to me overcompensating and my restricted eating breaks down completely

- IF+Restricted eating will generate 1-3lbs reductions per week

- IF alone will yield maybe 1lb or less per week (low CHO eating leads to lower kcals intake for me, pretty reliably)

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