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Proven Non-Hormonal Anabolic Agents


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Here is the key table from that paper where they summarize the findings on testosterone:   Long Jack seems pretty reliable. The rest have too few studies to really know. The ashwagandh

One more on PA   "Efficacy of phosphatidic acid ingestion on lean body mass, muscle thickness and strength gains in resistance-trained men" http://www.jissn.com/content/9/1/47   One of the more i

OOOhh, I want the special edition Micro Charles Poliquin.  How pissed-off would that thing be?!  We could keep them in Poke-balls and battle them...   Sorry, I don't actually have anything usful to

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Phosphatidic acid has been getting hype since the Hoffman study in late 2012 showing 12% increase in squat strength and a 2.5% increase in LBM. Then Jacob Wilson put it to the test again in 2013 and presented it at ISSN. Again it added about double the LBM in experienced trainees vs placebo.

 

Chemi Nutra also has a bunch of experiments on weight trainees for added support. They have a patent that's virtually covered every supplemental sales angle you could think of with this stuff. They also have patents on a few other popular things such as serinaid, alpha GPC, phospholean (including NOPE), etc.

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dont like to talk too much about supplements

but, here goes

and sorry is funded by chemi nutra, but i post another study,

industry detached and sorry benson, on myotubes....

 

http://www.jissn.com/content/10/S1/P13

 

the other

 

http://www.biosignaling.com/content/11/1/55

 

 

 

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but 2.4 kg in 8 weeks to me........ :(

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One more on PA

 

"Efficacy of phosphatidic acid ingestion on lean body mass, muscle thickness and strength gains in resistance-trained men"

http://www.jissn.com/content/9/1/47

 

One of the more interesting things about this stuff is that it appears to be effective in very small quantities.

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Is there a micro Bill L. and Par as well? A tiny sprinting Mike McCandless with a matching cuda. I want to collect the whole set!

OOOhh, I want the special edition Micro Charles Poliquin.  How pissed-off would that thing be?!  We could keep them in Poke-balls and battle them...

 

Sorry, I don't actually have anything usful to add. :ph34r:

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interesting and somewhat related...
 
 
Effects of methionine supplementation on the expression of oxidative stress-related genes in acute heat stress-exposed broilers

http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=9560875&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0007114514003535

 
...methionine supplementation could mitigate the effects of stress, since methionine contributed to the increased expression levels of genes related to antioxidant activity...

 

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.

 

 

but maybe not good for schizophrenics (prone and full blown)

 

 

A Methionine-Induced Animal Model of Schizophrenia: Face and Predictive Validity

 

http://ijnp.oxfordjournals.org/content/18/12/pyv054.full

 

Modulating the methylation process induces broad biochemical changes, some of which may be involved in schizophrenia. Methylation is in particular central to epigenesis, which is also recognized as a factor in the etiology of schizophrenia. Because methionine administration to patients with schizophrenia has been reported to exacerbate their psychotic symptoms and because mice treated with methionine exhibited social deficits and prepulse inhibition impairment, we investigated whether methionine administration could lead to behavioral changes that reflect schizophrenic symptoms in mice.

 

 

 

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why do you advocate methionine when it clearly shortens your life?

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4049285/

 

 

 

The Impact of Dietary Methionine Restriction on Biomarkers of Metabolic Health
The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci
Abstract

Calorie restriction without malnutrition, commonly referred to as dietary restriction (DR), results in a well-documented extension of life span. DR also produces significant, long-lasting improvements in biomarkers of metabolic health that begin to accrue soon after its introduction. The improvements are attributable in part to the effects of DR on energy balance, which limit fat accumulation through reduction in energy intake. Accumulation of excess body fat occurs when energy intake chronically exceeds the energy costs for growth and maintenance of existing tissue. The resulting obesity promotes the development of insulin resistance, disordered lipid metabolism, and increased expression of inflammatory markers in peripheral tissues. The link between the life-extending effects of DR and adiposity is the subject of an ongoing debate, but it is clear that decreased fat accumulation improves insulin sensitivity and produces beneficial effects on overall metabolic health. Over the last 20 years, dietary methionine restriction (MR) has emerged as a promising DR mimetic because it produces a comparable extension in life span, but surprisingly, does not require food restriction. Dietary MR also reduces adiposity but does so through a paradoxical increase in both energy intake and expenditure. The increase in energy expenditure fully compensates for increased energy intake and effectively limits fat deposition. Perhaps more importantly, the diet increases metabolic flexibility and overall insulin sensitivity and improves lipid metabolism while decreasing systemic inflammation. In this chapter, we describe recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and effects of dietary MR and discuss the remaining obstacles to implementing MR as a treatment for metabolic disease.

Abstract

 

 

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2691799/

 

 

Life-Span Extension in Mice by Preweaning Food Restriction and by Methionine Restriction in Middle Age
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Abstract

Life span can be extended in rodents by restricting food availability (caloric restriction [CR]) or by providing food low in methionine (Meth-R). Here, we show that a period of food restriction limited to the first 20 days of life, via a 50% enlargement of litter size, shows extended median and maximal life span relative to mice from normal sized litters and that a Meth-R diet initiated at 12 months of age also significantly increases longevity. Furthermore, mice exposed to a CR diet show changes in liver messenger RNA patterns, in phosphorylation of Erk, Jnk2, and p38 kinases, and in phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its substrate 4EBP1, HE-binding protein 1 that are not observed in liver from age-matched Meth-R mice. These results introduce new protocols that can increase maximal life span and suggest that the spectrum of metabolic changes induced by low-calorie and low-methionine diets may differ in instructive ways.

Abstract

 

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Here is the key table from that paper where they summarize the findings on testosterone:

Screen Shot 2019-03-06 at 9.43.41 AM.png

 

Long Jack seems pretty reliable. The rest have too few studies to really know. The ashwagandha study is interesting, though, because the effect size is large and it already has well-established effects on stress.

 

Regarding garlic, they say this:

Quote

[After summarizing the results in rodents...] However, there is a paucity of investigations regarding the effects of garlic on T and spermatogenesis in humans. A recent systematic review assessed results from experimental studies (H et al., 2018) concluding that garlic might confer potential effects on the enhancement of fertility and spermatogenesis, increasing T levels, and improving testicular structure, likely through antioxidant properties (H et al., 2018). Collectively, garlic is propitious and warrants further investigation in clinical trials of male hypogonadism.

 
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Caffeine is a well-established ergogenic aid, although research to date has predominantly focused on anhydrous caffeine, and in men. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of coffee ingestion on 5 km cycling time trial performance, and to establish whether sex differences exist. A total of 38 participants (19 men and 19 women) completed a 5 km time trial following the ingestion of 0.09 g·kg-1 coffee providing 3 mg·kg-1 of caffeine (COF), a placebo (PLA), in 300 mL of water, or control (CON). Coffee ingestion significantly increased salivary caffeine levels (p < 0.001; η2P = 0.75) and, overall, resulted in improved 5 km time trial performance (p < 0.001; η2P = 0.23). Performance following COF (482 ± 51 s) was faster than PLA (491 ± 53 s; p = 0.002; d = 0.17) and CON (487 ± 52 s; p =0.002; d = 0.10) trials, with men and women both improving by approximately 9 seconds and 6 seconds following coffee ingestion compared with placebo and control, respectively. However, no differences were observed between CON and PLA (p = 0.321; d = 0.08). In conclusion, ingesting coffee providing 3 mg·kg-1 of caffeine increased salivary caffeine levels and improved 5 km cycling time trial performance in men and women by a similar magnitude.

 

FFT

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Int J Prev Med. 2019 Jul 5;10:118. doi: 10.4103/ijpvm.IJPVM_404_17. eCollection 2019.
Effects of Eurycoma Longifolia Jack Supplementation Combined with Resistance Training on Isokinetic Muscular Strength and Power, Anaerobic Power, and Urinary Testosterone: Epitestosterone Ratio in Young Males
Chee Keong Chen 1 2, Foong Kiew Ooi 1 2, Nurul Ain Abu Kasim 1, Mohd Asnizam Asari 3

Abstract
Introduction: This study investigated the effects of resistance training and Eurycoma longifolia Jack supplementation on isokinetic muscular strength and power, Wingate anaerobic power, and testosterone: epitestosterone (T/E) ratio in young males.

 

Methods: Forty young males were weight-matched and assigned into four groups: control (C), Eurycoma longifolia jack (ElJ), resistance training (RT), and Eurycoma longifolia Jack plus resistance training group (ElJ & RT). Participants in ElJ and ElJ & RT groups consumed 200 mg Eurycoma longifolia Jack daily, whereas participants in the C and RT groups consumed placebo capsules daily for 8 weeks. Resistance training program which consisted of 10 different exercises was conducted three times per week for 8 weeks. Participants' isokinetic muscular strength and power, anaerobic power, and urinary TE ratio were measured before and after the intervention period. This is a randomized placebo-controlled intervention study. Paired t-test and one-way analysis of variance were used for statistical analysis.

 

Results: The mean average power of knee flexion at 300°/s in the RT and ElJ & RT groups was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the posttest compared with pretest. Wingate relative peak power in the RT group increased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with respective pretest value, whereas peak power in the combined ElJ & RT group was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in posttest compared with pretest. There was no significant difference in T/E ratio between pre- and posttests in all the groups.

 

Conclusions: The prescribed resistance training program, either with or without ElJ supplementation, improved isokinetic power of the lower limb. Resistance training alone improved relative anaerobic power, whereas combined Eurycoma longifolia Jack and resistance training improved peak power output. ElJ consumption of 200 mg daily for 8 weeks did not affect the urinary T/E ratio.

 

 

FFT

 

 

 

 

Phytother Res. 2014 Apr;28(4):544-50. doi: 10.1002/ptr.5017. Epub 2013 Jun 11.

Tongkat Ali as a potential herbal supplement for physically active male and female seniors--a pilot study
Ralf R Henkel 1, Ruxiang Wang, Susan H Bassett, Tao Chen, Na Liu, Ying Zhu, Mohd Ismail Tambi

Abstract
Tongkat Ali (Eurycoma longifolia; TA) is known to increase testosterone levels and alleviate aging males' symptoms. This study aimed at investigating TA as an ergogenic supplement for elderly people. Thirteen physically active male and 12 physically active female seniors (57-72 years) were supplemented with 400-mg TA extract daily for 5 weeks. Standard hematological parameters were taken. In addition, the concentrations of total and free testosterone, dihydroepiandrosterone, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1, and sex hormone-binding globulin were analyzed. As additional biochemical parameters, blood urea nitrogen and creatine kinase as parameters of kidney function and muscle damage, respectively, as well as the muscle strength by a simple handgrip test were determined. After treatment, hemoglobin, testosterone, and dihydroepiandrosterone concentrations, and the ratio of total testosterone/cortisol and muscle force remained significantly lower in female seniors than in male seniors. Hematocrit and erythrocyte count in male seniors increased slightly but were significantly higher than in female seniors. Treatment resulted in significant increases in total and free testosterone concentrations and muscular force in men and women. The increase in free testosterone in women is thought to be due to the significant decline in sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations. The study affirms the ergogenic benefit of TA through enhanced muscle strength.

 

PMID: 23754792

 

 

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