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STENDEC

Running Is Good For You: A Little or A Lot.

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This is sort of interesting and shows that while running appears to reduce all-cause and CV mortality, there appears to be very little dose response...compared to not running, a very little bit of running and a fairly slow pace appears to be just about as good (possibly better) as a lot of fast running.

 

Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume 64, Issue 5, August 2014

Leisure-Time Running Reduces All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality Risk
Duck-chul Lee, Russell R. Pate, Carl J. Lavie, Xuemei Sui, Timothy S. Church and Steven N. Blair

 


Background

Although running is a popular leisure-time physical activity, little is known about the long-term effects of running on mortality. The dose-response relations between running, as well as the change in running behaviors over time, and mortality remain uncertain.

 

Objectives We examined the associations of running with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risks in 55,137 adults, 18 to 100 years of age (mean age 44 years).

 

Methods

Running was assessed on a medical history questionnaire by leisure-time activity.

 

Results

During a mean follow-up of 15 years, 3,413 all-cause and 1,217 cardiovascular deaths occurred. Approximately 24% of adults participated in running in this population. Compared with nonrunners, runners had 30% and 45% lower adjusted risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, with a 3-year life expectancy benefit. In dose-response analyses, the mortality benefits in runners were similar across quintiles of running time, distance, frequency, amount, and speed, compared with nonrunners. Weekly running even <51 min, <6 miles, 1 to 2 times, <506 metabolic equivalent-minutes, or <6 miles/h was sufficient to reduce risk of mortality, compared with not running. In the analyses of change in running behaviors and mortality, persistent runners had the most significant benefits, with 29% and 50% lower risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, respectively, compared with never-runners.

 

Conclusions

Running, even 5 to 10 min/day and at slow speeds <6 miles/h, is associated with markedly reduced risks of death from all causes and cardiovascular disease. This study may motivate healthy but sedentary individuals to begin and continue running for substantial and attainable mortality benefits.

 

FFT

 

 

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Simply from an injujry prevention standpoint, less running would probably make more sense, as running related injuries are fairly common.

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Just now, Kimbo said:

Simply from an injujry prevention standpoint, less running would probably make more sense, as running related injuries are fairly common.

 

Absolutely. That you can gain all of the cardio and mortality benefits of running by running quite slowly for a couple of miles once or twice a week should call anything more than that into question...

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On 01/15/2018 at 4:29 PM, STENDEC said:

 

Absolutely. That you can gain all of the cardio and mortality benefits of running by running quite slowly for a couple of miles once or twice a week should call anything more than that into question...

 

What about once or twice a month? Haha. I could get behind that.

 

Seriously good to know that I'm not missing out by running once a week (typically). Plus I figure lifting counts for something as it gets my heart beating pretty good as well.

 

I also love how they started out:

"Although running is a popular leisure-time physical activity..."

:lol:

 

I dislike running for sure, but do like the way I feel when I'm done.

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Any amount of running linked to significantly lower risk of early death
Substantial improvements in population health/longevity likely if more people took it up, say researchers

Science News

November 4, 2019

Any amount of running is linked to a significantly lower risk of death from any cause, finds a pooled analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. If more people took up running -- and they wouldn't have to run far or fast -- there would likely be substantial improvements in population health and longevity, conclude the researchers.

 

It's not clear how good running is for staving off the risk of death from any cause and particularly from cardiovascular disease and cancer, say the researchers.

Nor is it clear how much running a person needs to do to reap these potential benefits, nor whether upping the frequency, duration, and pace -- in other words, increasing the 'dose' -- might be even more advantageous. To try and find out, the researchers systematically reviewed relevant published research, conference presentations, and doctoral theses and dissertations in a broad range of academic databases.

 

They looked for studies on the association between running/jogging and the risk of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. They found 14 suitable studies, involving 232,149 people, whose health had been tracked for between 5.5 and 35 years. During this time, 25,951 of the study participants died. When the study data were pooled, any amount of running was associated with a 27% lower risk of death from all causes for both sexes, compared with no running. And it was associated with a 30% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and a 23% lower risk of death from cancer.

 

Even small 'doses' -- for example, once weekly or less, lasting less than 50 minutes each time, and at a speed below 6 miles (8 km) an hour, still seemed to be associated with significant health/longevity benefits. So running for 25 minutes less than the recommended weekly duration of vigorous physical activity could reduce the risk of death. This makes running a potentially good option for those whose main obstacle to doing enough exercise is lack of time, suggest the researchers. But upping 'the dose' wasn't associated with a further lowering of the risk of death from any cause, the analysis showed.

 

This is an observational study, and as such, can't establish cause. And the researchers caution that the number of included studies was small and their methods varied considerably, which may have influenced the results. Nevertheless, they suggest that any amount of running is better than none, concluding: "Increased rates of participation in running, regardless of its dose, would probably lead to substantial improvements in population health and longevity."

 

 

Journal Reference:

Zeljko Pedisic, Nipun Shrestha, Stephanie Kovalchik, Emmanuel Stamatakis, Nucharapon Liangruenrom, Jozo Grgic, Sylvia Titze, Stuart JH Biddle, Adrian E Bauman, Pekka Oja. Is running associated with a lower risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality, and is the more the better? A systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 2019; bjsports-2018-100493 DOI: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-100493

 

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