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STENDEC

Collagen/Bone Broth

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Your last post has my attention, Mr. Stendec...

 

I would also note for the record that I have been performing isometric exercises on my extensors, and my persistent elbow tendinitis is in some form of remission, perhaps. 

 

So if I come in raving about collagen fixing my elbow, it's probably not the case...lol But it might help to strengthen my connective tissues which might assist me.

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5 hours ago, STENDEC said:

The lay press article that basically says we are all full of hooey....

I remember that article.

Quote: "...looked at the structure of collagen and concluded that oral supplements can’t remedy a breakdown (read: injury). "

But when I read the study (well, skimmed) I found no mention of oral supplements, nor any attempt to measure the effect of supplementation in animals in that study.

So I took it as another example of shoddy interpretation of a highly technical paper. Majorie Korn, the author, is a journalist who writes articles like "Best exfoliators" and "Steaming Clams" for Mens' Journal, FWIW

 

BTW, the scientist quoted is probably right because he's a Kinesiologist PhD who studies collagen. I do know that my fingernails have always grown twice as fast when I take gelatin or collage supplements. That's not the same as healing tendons, of course. But unless the scientist is doing supplementation studies instead of simulations there's a gap between his data and the premise of the article.

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7 hours ago, Sanction said:

But when I read the study (well, skimmed) I found no mention of oral supplements, nor any attempt to measure the effect of supplementation in animals in that study.

 

I had the same results...I went over the linked study several times and it did not seem to actually be about oral collagen supplementation at all.

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 2014;27(1):47-55. doi: 10.1159/000351376. Epub 2013 Aug 14.

Oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides has beneficial effects on human skin physiology: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

Abstract

Various dietary supplements are claimed to have cutaneous anti-aging properties; however, there are a limited number of research studies supporting these claims. The objective of this research was to study the effectiveness of collagen hydrolysate (CH) composed of specific collagen peptides on skin biophysical parameters related to cutaneous aging. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 69 women aged 35-55 years were randomized to receive 2.5 g or 5.0 g of CH or placebo once daily for 8 weeks, with 23 subjects being allocated to each treatment group. Skin elasticity, skin moisture, transepidermal water loss and skin roughness were objectively measured before the first oral product application (t0) and after 4 (t1) and 8 weeks (t2) of regular intake. Skin elasticity (primary interest) was also assessed at follow-up 4 weeks after the last intake of CH (t3, 4-week regression phase). At the end of the study, skin elasticity in both CH dosage groups showed a statistically significant improvement in comparison to placebo. After 4 weeks of follow-up treatment, a statistically significantly higher skin elasticity level was determined in elderly women. With regard to skin moisture and skin evaporation, a positive influence of CH treatment could be observed in a subgroup analysis, but data failed to reach a level of statistical significance. No side effects were noted throughout the study.

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 2015 Oct 28;114(8):1237-45. doi: 10.1017/S0007114515002810. Epub 2015 Sep 10.

Collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training improves body composition and increases muscle strength in elderly sarcopenic men: a randomised controlled trial.

Abstract

Protein supplementation in combination with resistance training may increase muscle mass and muscle strength in elderly subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of post-exercise protein supplementation with collagen peptides v. placebo on muscle mass and muscle function following resistance training in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. A total of fifty-three male subjects (72·2 (sd 4·68) years) with sarcopenia (class I or II) completed this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. All the participants underwent a 12-week guided resistance training programme (three sessions per week) and were supplemented with either collagen peptides (treatment group (TG)) (15 g/d) or silica as placebo (placebo group (PG)). Fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM) and bone mass (BM) were measured before and after the intervention using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic quadriceps strength (IQS) of the right leg was determined and sensory motor control (SMC) was investigated by a standardised one-leg stabilisation test. Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (P<0·01) levels for FFM, BM, IQS and SMC with significantly lower (P<0·01) levels for FM. The effect was significantly more pronounced in subjects receiving collagen peptides: FFM (TG +4·2 (sd 2·31) kg/PG +2·9 (sd 1·84) kg; P<0·05); IQS (TG +16·5 (sd 12·9) Nm/PG +7·3 (sd 13·2) Nm; P<0·05); and FM (TG -5·4 (sd 3·17) kg/PG -3·5 (sd 2·16) kg; P<0·05). Our data demonstrate that compared with placebo, collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

KEYWORDS:

Ageing; Collagen hydrolysate; Collagen peptides; FFM fat-free mass; FM fat mass; PG placebo group; Protein supplementation; RCT randomised controlled trial; Resistance exercise; Sarcopenia; TG treatment group

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19 hours ago, Emperor G_D said:

Seems like there's a bit of study on it. I don't see anything indicating that oral supplementation doesn't do something

 

No question. Collage is a source of protein and protein supplementation has well documented effects...what's still unclear to me, at least from the research, is whether or not collagen supplements have effects that are different from supplementing the same amount of gemma or egg protein...

 

In the end, it is an easy way for me to add an additional 40g of protein in and I think it is having effects on my hair and skin that I wouldn't see with the same amount of whey....but who knows?

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I ordered the Code Age product to play around with. Mostly hoping it will help one of my knees, but I'm pretty sure that issue stems from something else being too tight. 

 

It mixes pretty easily into coffee. Just like making hot cocoa, the key is to add a little liquid and mix vigorously before you fill the cup too high. 

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I just got my perfotek. Mixed one into cold coffee (its 35C here). mixed better than whey :)

STEDENC how much are you taking per day? the scoop inside looks HYOOGE

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Looks like the ideal time to take in collagen is around 1hr before workout time.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852613

 

"Subjects who took 15 g gelatin 1 h before exercise showed double the amino-terminal propeptide of collagen I in their blood, indicating increased collagen synthesis."

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On 6/12/2019 at 5:57 PM, Kimbo said:

Looks like the ideal time to take in collagen is around 1hr before workout time.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27852613

 

"Subjects who took 15 g gelatin 1 h before exercise showed double the amino-terminal propeptide of collagen I in their blood, indicating increased collagen synthesis."

 

Nice find! I was wondering when the best time to take it was.

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8 minutes ago, Emperor G_D said:

 

I take it in my PWO.

I think PWO is probably just as good. Any time blood flow is increased to the joints and connective tissue seems good to me.

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1 hour ago, Kimbo said:

I think PWO is probably just as good. Any time blood flow is increased to the joints and connective tissue seems good to me.

 

To be more clear: That's 30-60 minutes before a workout, so it's within the suggestion.

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10 hours ago, Emperor G_D said:

 

To be more clear: That's 30-60 minutes before a workout, so it's within the suggestion.

Gotcha. I read PWO as "post workout".

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On 6/27/2019 at 9:09 AM, Kimbo said:

Gotcha. I read PWO as "post workout".

PWO is "post workout"

"Pre workout" is PreWO

 

Isn't that the common typenacular?

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Sounds pretty fucking arbitrary.

 

Since I don't have a PostWO routine, PWO is PreWO. I don't know if one is more common than the other, since it's basically arbitrary.

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5 hours ago, Emperor G_D said:

Sounds pretty fucking arbitrary.

 

Since I don't have a PostWO routine, PWO is PreWO. I don't know if one is more common than the other, since it's basically arbitrary.

Lol I was avant lab-ing. Or, Caleb-ing, rather. 

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On 6/29/2019 at 7:25 PM, Emperor G_D said:

Sounds pretty fucking arbitrary.

 

Since I don't have a PostWO routine, PWO is PreWO. I don't know if one is more common than the other, since it's basically arbitrary.

I am pretty sure everyone agrees that PWO stands for Peri-workout. Which, if I am interpreting your log correctly, you also do not have. 

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