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STENDEC

One (New) Direction

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Chest

 

Flat Bench, Incline DB Flyes, Standing High/Low Cable Flyes, Plates Presses

 

So I was able to do 225x8 on the flat bench with almost no shoulder/pec pain which was a major achievement. My goal for the summer is to get back to three wheels with good form and no pain so I can at least show up to the PL comp in the fall.

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Shoulders

 

OHP to 185x2 (yes, good form and no leg drive @mwarren ), Lateral/Front DB Raises, Cable OHP, Single Arm Landmine Press, Shrugs, Plate Raises

 

So this is a good example of how RPE doesn't really work for me. I was not planning to do 185 pound OHP once, nevermind twice today...and if you have asked me what the perceived exertion would have been for 185 for me before I walked in the gym today, I would have confidently said 11.

 

But, I loaded up the bar with 135 and knocked off 10 thinking that felt fairly easy....so I added 20lbs and did a set of 8 also thinking that it was not as hard as I expected it to be...so I put 185 on and just went for it, getting two clean reps and almost a third before my spotter intervened when I began to stall...and just for giggles, I made a poke at 205 but didn't get it more than an inch off the pins....

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Good stuff :)

 

Sometimes we peak our nervous system just right without planning it. I'm dead on OHP after a maximal effort. I can barely lift 85% of it on the next set. So I can see 205 not budging, especially after a double.

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2 hours ago, Emperor G_D said:

But isn't that a good example of how RPE *does* work? 

I was gonna say...but since we have hashed that one out the the point of annoyance, I will just acknowledge the effort

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On ‎6‎/‎18‎/‎2019 at 5:51 PM, STENDEC said:

Shoulders

 

OHP to 185x2 (yes, good form and no leg drive @mwarren ), Lateral/Front DB Raises, Cable OHP, Single Arm Landmine Press, Shrugs, Plate Raises

 

So this is a good example of how RPE doesn't really work for me. I was not planning to do 185 pound OHP once, nevermind twice today...and if you have asked me what the perceived exertion would have been for 185 for me before I walked in the gym today, I would have confidently said 11.

 

But, I loaded up the bar with 135 and knocked off 10 thinking that felt fairly easy....so I added 20lbs and did a set of 8 also thinking that it was not as hard as I expected it to be...so I put 185 on and just went for it, getting two clean reps and almost a third before my spotter intervened when I began to stall...and just for giggles, I made a poke at 205 but didn't get it more than an inch off the pins....

Now, I may be being too literal minded here, but aren't you talking about predicted rate of perceived effort vs actual rate of perceived effort? Maybe I am using RPE incorrectly, but I assess it based on the set I just finished.

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6 hours ago, Ras said:

Maybe I am using RPE incorrectly, but I assess it based on the set I just finished.

 

Maybe I don't understand what it is supposed to do....if it is retrospective and not a planning tool then yes, it probably works just fine although I'm not sure I get the value of saying: well that last rep was probably almost the most I can lift....

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1 hour ago, STENDEC said:

 

Maybe I don't understand what it is supposed to do....if it is retrospective and not a planning tool then yes, it probably works just fine although I'm not sure I get the value of saying: well that last rep was probably almost the most I can lift....

I mean, both of us are kind of instinctual trainers - I don't 'use' it really because I don't do programming, so may be talking out of my ass.

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4 hours ago, STENDEC said:

 

Maybe I don't understand what it is supposed to do....if it is retrospective and not a planning tool then yes, it probably works just fine although I'm not sure I get the value of saying: well that last rep was probably almost the most I can lift....

So as an example, 5/3/1 is built around the concept of RPE, as it turns out. One of the most central tenets of the program, perhaps right after submax training, is lifting to an RPE of 9-9.5. How do I know this, since it wasn't mentioned verbatim in the books? He says leave a rep in the tank. That would be RPE 9-9.5.

 

The idea is that when you are training for strength, for anyone who has completely exhausted their newbie gains, neuromuscular adaptations are more important than hypertrophy in driving strength, though of course this isn't a recommendation to focus on one in lieu of the other. Specific adaptations to imposed demands (SAID) is effectively a term in exercise science for "perfect practice makes perfect." So the higher the integrity of your form is during your training, the better that translates to strength adaptations. But since nobody is actually going around lifting 1s, 3s, and 5s exclusively, a way to periodize the program is to fix RPE (usually a 9, with maybe lower numbers during early accumulation blocks and higher RPEs towards the end of an intensification phase) and wave volume as necessary, with the occasional drop in RPE to allow for neurological recovery (deload) as well as soft tissue recovery.

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11 hours ago, Ras said:

I mean, both of us are kind of instinctual trainers

 

This. Most of the time in the gym I use the The Force to direct my training...

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On 6/18/2019 at 1:51 PM, STENDEC said:

So this is a good example of how RPE doesn't really work for me. I was not planning to do 185 pound OHP once, nevermind twice today...and if you have asked me what the perceived exertion would have been for 185 for me before I walked in the gym today, I would have confidently said 11.

 

On 6/20/2019 at 2:04 PM, STENDEC said:

 

Maybe I don't understand what it is supposed to do....if it is retrospective and not a planning tool then yes, it probably works just fine although I'm not sure I get the value of saying: well that last rep was probably almost the most I can lift....

 

RPE is just a psychological/logical scale to accompany auto-regulation. Auto-regulation isn't retrospective, I think it's all-inclusive. That does not mean you can't do a workout and then when making notes call it an RPEX workout. While I think many people abuse the hell out of RPE, if you can harness it to determine your auto-regulated session, that's great.

 

Example:

You come into the gym thinking you'll hit 165 for a few on OHP. 135 for 10 flies up and feels like a feather, so we'll call that maybe RPE5

155 by 8 was easy and felt like maybe an RPE7

You feel like 185 is doable today, though you are a bit hesitant as you believe 185 is just out of reach, but given the prior two sets you figure you'll make that RPE10 attempt of 185x1, only to find that 185x2 was your RPE9/9.5

205 was RPE11: no dice, old man. :D

 

So, to me, your example is auto-regulation in action. Being able to use those primary sets to determine your top set is just how it's supposed to work, and RPE is an OK scale to use for it.

 

Maybe I need to use some auto-regulation now that I should have a bit more headroom in my workouts and I'm not trying to kill myself for any real kind of results. It might convert me to RPE/AR.

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On 6/20/2019 at 6:10 PM, Growth Factor said:

So as an example, 5/3/1 is built around the concept of RPE, as it turns out. One of the most central tenets of the program, perhaps right after submax training, is lifting to an RPE of 9-9.5. How do I know this, since it wasn't mentioned verbatim in the books? He says leave a rep in the tank. That would be RPE 9-9.5.

 

The idea is that when you are training for strength, for anyone who has completely exhausted their newbie gains, neuromuscular adaptations are more important than hypertrophy in driving strength, though of course this isn't a recommendation to focus on one in lieu of the other. Specific adaptations to imposed demands (SAID) is effectively a term in exercise science for "perfect practice makes perfect." So the higher the integrity of your form is during your training, the better that translates to strength adaptations. But since nobody is actually going around lifting 1s, 3s, and 5s exclusively, a way to periodize the program is to fix RPE (usually a 9, with maybe lower numbers during early accumulation blocks and higher RPEs towards the end of an intensification phase) and wave volume as necessary, with the occasional drop in RPE to allow for neurological recovery (deload) as well as soft tissue recovery.

 

We should take an RPE chart with percentages, and hide the percentages to a 5/3/1 program and use RPE numbers instead. lol

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1 hour ago, Emperor G_D said:

You come into the gym thinking you'll hit 165 for a few on OHP. 135 for 10 flies up and feels like a feather, so we'll call that maybe RPE5

155 by 8 was easy and felt like maybe an RPE7

You feel like 185 is doable today, though you are a bit hesitant as you believe 185 is just out of reach, but given the prior two sets you figure you'll make that RPE10 attempt of 185x1, only to find that 185x2 was your RPE9/9.5

205 was RPE11: no dice, old man.

 

I don't disagree with any of this....but I'm still not sure I understand the value of assigning subjective intensity numbers to my lifts....especially after I've already done them.

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39 minutes ago, STENDEC said:

 

I don't disagree with any of this....but I'm still not sure I understand the value of assigning subjective intensity numbers to my lifts....especially after I've already done them.

It's about lifting to an effort level. If your training calls for a 9, perform enough reps until the point that you leave only 1 solid rep in the tank

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1 hour ago, STENDEC said:

 

I don't disagree with any of this....but I'm still not sure I understand the value of assigning subjective intensity numbers to my lifts....especially after I've already done them.

 

Well, you used your preceding sets and their performance to make the decision to hit 185, right? With the exception of assigning a scale, you're already there. 

 

If you set up your training to hit a certain intensity on a certain day, and if you assigned it a value between 1 and 10, then you have both auto-regulated, and used RPE...

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Chest & Tris

 

Standing Cable Flyes, Incline DB Press, Triceps Pressdown, Standing Cable Pullovers, Single Arm Cable Crossovers, Inch Press, DB Pullovers

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Legs

 

#weightedvest

 

Goblet Squats, BB Lunges, Step Ups, Walking Lunges, Box Jumps to 27"

 

Felt really good doing this today. Goblet Squats were with a 100# DB and all the way elbows to knees. Box jumps surprised me given I was wearing the 25# vest for them too.

 

 

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