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Eating breakfast burns more carbs during exercise and accelerates metabolism for next meal
Science News
August 15, 2018

Eating breakfast before exercise may "prime" the body to burn carbohydrates during exercise and more rapidly digest food after working out, University of Bath researchers have found. Scientists from the University's Department for Health, working with colleagues at the universities of Birmingham, Newcastle and Stirling, were studying the effect of eating breakfast versus fasting overnight before an hour's cycling. In a control test breakfast was followed by three hours' rest. The volunteers ate a breakfast of porridge made with milk two hours before exercise.

 

Post exercise or rest, the researchers tested the blood glucose levels and muscle glycogen levels of the 12 healthy male volunteers who took part.

They discovered that eating breakfast increased the rate at which the body burned carbohydrates during exercise, as well as increasing the rate the body digested and metabolised food eaten after exercise too.

 

Dr Javier Gonzalez, senior lecturer in the Department of Health who co-led the study, said: "This is the first study to examine the ways in which breakfast before exercise influences our responses to meals after exercise. We found that, compared to skipping breakfast, eating breakfast before exercise increases the speed at which we digest, absorb and metabolise carbohydrate that we may eat after exercise."

Rob Edinburgh, PhD student in the Department for Health who co-led the study, said: "We also found that breakfast before exercise increases carbohydrate burning during exercise, and that this carbohydrate wasn't just coming from the breakfast that was just eaten, but also from carbohydrate stored in our muscles as glycogen. This increase in the use of muscle glycogen may explain why there was more rapid clearance of blood sugar after 'lunch' when breakfast had been consumed before exercise.

 

"This study suggests that, at least after a single bout of exercise, eating breakfast before exercise may 'prime' our body, ready for rapid storage of nutrition when we eat meals after exercise." The study is published in American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism.

An interesting aspect of this research is that it shows that extrapolating from other studies conducted on people who are fasted, which is common in metabolism experiments, may not be reliable, as being fed alters metabolism.

 

Dr Gonzalez added: "Whilst fasting prior to laboratory trials is common in order to control for baseline metabolic status, these conditions may preclude the application of findings to situations most representative of daily living, because most people are not fasted during the day." Rob Edinburgh said: "As this study only assessed the short-term responses to breakfast and exercise, the longer-term implications of this work are unclear, and we have ongoing studies looking at whether eating breakfast before or after exercise on a regular basis influences health.

 

"In particular there is a clear need for more research looking at the effect of what we eat before exercise on health outcomes, but with overweight participants who might be at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These are some of the questions we will now try to answer."

The research was funded by grants from The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, The Rank Prize Funds, and the Medical Research Council.

 

Journal Reference:

Robert M. Edinburgh, Aaron Hengist, Harry A. Smith, Rebecca L Travers, Francoise Koumanov, James A. Betts, Dylan Thompson, Jean-Philippe Walhin, Gareth A. Wallis, D. Lee Hamilton, Emma J. Stevenson, Kevin D. Tipton, Javier T. Gonzalez. Pre-Exercise Breakfast Ingestion versus Extended Overnight Fasting Increases Postprandial Glucose Flux after Exercise in Healthy Men. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 2018; DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00163.2018

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14 hours ago, Mr.Kite said:

Sounds like a downside to me if you want to burn fat during your workouts. Actually indirectly gives further support to the idea you want to train fasted for fat loss.

Although maybe eating a fat-based breakfast might work for that purpose.

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Bray said the research team found that fat intake at the time of waking seems to turn on fat metabolism very efficiently and also turns on the animal's ability to respond to different types of food later in the day. When the animals were fed carbohydrates upon waking, carbohydrate metabolism was turned on and seemed to stay on even when the animal was eating different kinds of food later in the day.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/7540732/A-high-fat-breakfast-of-bacon-and-eggs-may-be-the-healthiest-start-to-the-day-report-shows.html

 

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People who eat a big breakfast may burn twice as many calories
Study finds eating more at breakfast instead of dinner could prevent obesity
Science News, February 19, 2020

Eating a big breakfast rather than a large dinner may prevent obesity and high blood sugar, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Our body expends energy when we digest food for the absorption, digestion, transport and storage of nutrients. This process, known as diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT), is a measure of how well our metabolism is working, and can differ depending on mealtime.

 

"Our results show that a meal eaten for breakfast, regardless of the amount of calories it contains, creates twice as high diet-induced thermogenesis as the same meal consumed for dinner," said the study's corresponding author, Juliane Richter, M.Sc., Ph.D., of University of Lübeck in Germany. "This finding is significant for all people as it underlines the value of eating enough at breakfast."

 

The researchers conducted a three-day laboratory study of 16 men who consumed a low-calorie breakfast and high-calorie dinner, and vice versa in a second round. They found identical calorie consumption led to 2.5 times higher DIT in the morning than in the evening after high-calorie and low-calorie meals. The food-induced increase of blood sugar and insulin concentrations was diminished after breakfast compared with dinner. The results also show eating a low-calorie breakfast increased appetite, specifically for sweets.

"We recommend that patients with obesity as well as healthy people eat a large breakfast rather than a large dinner to reduce body weight and prevent metabolic diseases," Richter said.

 

 

Journal Reference:

Kerstin M Oltmanns, Alina Kistenmacher, Thalke Baumann, Simon Janka, Nina Herzog, Juliane Richter. Twice as High Diet-Induced Thermogenesis After Breakfast vs Dinner On High-Calorie as Well as Low-Calorie Meals. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2020; 105 (3) DOI: 10.1210/clinem/dgz311

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I always feel pretty good when eating a big breakfast.  I hardly ever feel hungrier than if I ate smaller ones.

 

My usual breakfast is 6 hard boiled eggs, 2 servings of oats with a scoop of protein and peanut butter and a bowl of yogurt.  I feel awesome with this and it's like 900 calories.  I can feel good until like 2-3 in the afternoon with that.  I grab a shake at ~10 and that seems to work for me.

 

I also sleep like ass when I eat a huge dinner so this tracks for me.

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WTH? That's a fucking man's breakfast. I usually end up eating 3 eggs cooked somehow, maybe a little bit of meat. Or 3 hard boiled eggs and some of Ben's favorite Fage yogurt. Something like that.

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When should you eat to manage your weight? Breakfast, not late-night snacks
Science News February 28, 2020

The balance between weight gain and weight gain loss is predominantly determined by what you eat, how much you eat, and by how much exercise you get. But another important factor is often neglected... Published February 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, research conducted by Kevin Kelly, Owen McGuinness, Carl Johnson and colleagues of Vanderbilt University, USA shows that it's not just how many calories you eat, but WHEN you eat them that will determine how well you burn those calories.

 

Your daily biological clock and sleep regulate how the food you eat is metabolized; thus the choice of burning fats or carbohydrates changes depending on the time of day or night. Your body's circadian rhythm has programmed your body to burn fat when you sleep, so when you skip breakfast and then snack at night you delay burning the fat. The researchers monitored the metabolism of mid-aged and older subjects in a whole-room respiratory chamber over two separate 56-hour sessions, using a "random crossover" experimental design. In each session, lunch and dinner were presented at the same times (12:30 and 17:45, respectively), but the timing of the third meal differed between the two halves of the study. Thus in one of the 56-hour bouts, the additional daily meal was presented as breakfast (8:00) whereas in the other session, a nutritionally equivalent meal was presented to the same subjects as a late-evening snack (22:00). The duration of the overnight fast was the same for both sessions.

 

Whereas the two sessions did not differ in the amount or type of food eaten or in the subjects' activity levels, the daily timing of nutrient availability, coupled with clock/sleep control of metabolism, flipped a switch in the subjects' fat/carbohydrate preference such that the late-evening snack session resulted in less fat burned when compared to the breakfast session. The timing of meals during the day/night cycle therefore affects the extent to which ingested food is used versus stored.

 

Journal Reference:

Kevin Parsons Kelly, Owen P. McGuinness, Maciej Buchowski, Jacob J. Hughey, Heidi Chen, James Powers, Terry Page, Carl Hirschie Johnson. Eating breakfast and avoiding late-evening snacking sustains lipid oxidation. PLOS Biology, 2020; 18 (2): e3000622 DOI:

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