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AlwaysForward

Finally MRI showing issues in the cervical (results enclosed)

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Oh, I spent over a decade smoking daily. I enjoy CBD in various strengths, too. I have had issues experiencing pain or anxiety reduction with it, though. 

 

We no longer need cards in CA, but, I haven't been able to prioritize sitting in a dispensary and having them find the right strain for me...it's expensive and a real pain. So my laziness and thriftiness is my current blocker. :D

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On 4/20/2020 at 11:45 PM, Emperor G_D said:

Oh, I spent over a decade smoking daily. I enjoy CBD in various strengths, too. I have had issues experiencing pain or anxiety reduction with it, though. 

 

We no longer need cards in CA, but, I haven't been able to prioritize sitting in a dispensary and having them find the right strain for me...it's expensive and a real pain. So my laziness and thriftiness is my current blocker. :D

Yep, I am in PA and it doesn't look great.  I am close to NY and NJ and so far a PA card is the path of least resistence.  As always, its only part of the solution like anything else.  That said, my boy (who is somehow 15 now) wants to start training so I have a renewed sense to get it together.  My issue is never motivation of course but trying to fit it in to a never ending circle of life related bullshit.  

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52 minutes ago, AlwaysForward said:

 trying to fit it in to a never ending circle of life related bullshit.  

 

^^ A nugget of wisdom there, or so I have concluded after all this time.

It's the very definition of what it is to be an adult.

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Clin J Pain. 2013 Apr;29(4):341-7. doi: 10.1097/AJP.0b013e318255655d.
Improvement of pain, sleep, and quality of life in chronic pain patients with vitamin D supplementation.
Huang W1, Shah S, Long Q, Crankshaw AK, Tangpricha V.

OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate the effects of vitamin D supplementation in outpatient veterans with multiple areas of chronic pain.

 

METHODS:
A case series was performed as an outpatient vitamin D supplementation quality improvement project. A total of 28 US veterans with multiple areas of chronic pain and low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] (<30 ng/mL) concentrations at baseline were identified in a major Veterans Affairs Medical Center from May 2009 till November 2010. They were supplemented with vitamin D 1200 IU daily if serum 25(OH)D was in the insufficient range (20 to 29 ng/mL) or 50,000 IU weekly if serum 25(OH)D was in the deficient range (<20 ng/mL). Standardized outcome measures were assessed before and after supplementation, including pain assessed by the 0 to 10 pain score and the bodily pain domain score of the Veterans Rand 36 item, sleep by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and quality of life (QoL) by the Veterans Rand 36 item.

 

RESULTS:
Participants reported no side effects during the study. Relative to baseline, pain, sleep, and QoL all improved except for role-functioning emotional. The improvements remained significant in pain score (P<0.001), sleep latency (P=0.019), sleep duration (P=0.012), bodily pain (P=0.014), general health (P=0.006), vitality (P=0.048), and social functioning (P=0.017) after controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, season, baseline serum 25(OH)D concentration subgroup, and whether or not participants received additional procedural intervention during the supplementation period.

 

CONCLUSIONS:
Standardized vitamin D supplementation in veterans with multiple areas of chronic pain can be effective in improving their pain levels, sleep, and various aspects of QoL.

 

PMID: 22699141 

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Pain Med. 2014 Sep;15(9):1609-18. doi: 10.1111/pme.12454. Epub 2014 Apr 14.
Vitamin D and central hypersensitivity in patients with chronic pain.
von Känel R1, Müller-Hartmannsgruber V, Kokinogenis G, Egloff N.

BACKGROUND:
Low vitamin D is implicated in various chronic pain conditions with, however, inconclusive findings. Vitamin D might play an important role in mechanisms being involved in central processing of evoked pain stimuli but less so for spontaneous clinical pain.

 

OBJECTIVE:
This study aims to examine the relation between low serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH D) and mechanical pain sensitivity.

 

DESIGN:
We studied 174 patients (mean age 48 years, 53% women) with chronic pain. A standardized pain provocation test was applied, and pain intensity was rated on a numerical analogue scale (0-10). The widespread pain index and symptom severity score (including fatigue, waking unrefreshed, and cognitive symptoms) following the 2010 American College of Rheumatology preliminary diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia were also assessed. Serum 25-OH D levels were measured with a chemiluminescent immunoassay.

 

RESULTS:
Vitamin deficiency (25-OH D < 50 nmol/L) was present in 71% of chronic pain patients; another 21% had insufficient vitamin D (25-OH D < 75 nmol/L). After adjustment for demographic and clinical variables, there was a mean ± standard error of the mean increase in pain intensity of 0.61 ± 0.25 for each 25 nmol/L decrease in 25-OH D (P = 0.011). Lower 25-OH D levels were also related to greater symptom severity (r = -0.21, P = 0.008) but not to the widespread pain index (P = 0.83) and fibromyalgia (P = 0.51).

 

CONCLUSIONS:
The findings suggest a role of low vitamin D levels for heightened central sensitivity, particularly augmented pain processing upon mechanical stimulation in chronic pain patients. Vitamin D seems comparably less important for self-reports of spontaneous chronic pain.

Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

 

PMID: 24730754

 

 

Int J Rheum Dis. 2016 Dec;19(12):1255-1262. doi: 10.1111/1756-185X.12960. Epub 2016 Nov 11.
Efficacy of vitamin D replacement therapy on patients with chronic nonspecific widespread musculoskeletal pain with vitamin D deficiency.
Yilmaz R1, Salli A2, Cingoz HT3, Kucuksen S2, Ugurlu H2.

AIM:
The objective of this study is the evaluation of the effect of vitamin D replacement treatment on musculoskeletal symptoms and quality of life in patients with chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain (CWP) including fibromyalgia (FM) and vitamin D deficiency.

 

METHOD:
Patients with nonspecific CWP and vitamin D deficiency (25-OH D3 < 25 ng/mL) were included into the study. Replacement treatments of 50 000 IU/week oral vitamin D3 for 3 months were given to the patients. Patients were assessed pre- and post-treatment in terms of serum levels of Ca, P, alkaline phosphatase, 25-OH D3, severity of pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]-pain), severity of asthenia (VAS-asthenia), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), quality of life scale (Short Form [SF]-36), tender point count (TPC), severity of waking unrefreshed, headache, tenderness on tibia, meeting the criteria of FM, and level of patient satisfaction.

 

RESULTS:
Fifty-eight patients with a mean age of 36.9 ± 9.2 years were included into the study. 25-OH D3 levels of patients elevated from 10.6 ± 5.1 ng/mL to 46.5 ± 24.0 ng/mL after replacement treatment (P < 0.001). Marked decrease in VAS-pain, VAS-asthenia, severity of waking unrefreshed, TPC, and BDI and an evident increase in subgroups of SF-36 were established in patients after treatment (P < 0.001). The number of FM+ patients was 30 (52%) before treatment and regressed to 20 (34%) after treatment (P = 0.013); 85% of patients stated satisfaction with the treatment.

 

CONCLUSIONS:
Vitamin D replacement treatment in patients with nonspecific CWP has provided improvements in musculoskeletal symptoms, level of depression and quality of life of patients. Patients with CWP should be investigated for vitamin D deficiency.

 

 

PMID: 27860257

 

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If you are suffering from chronic, nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, a course of high dose vitamin D (50-100k IU/week) might make some sense.

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On 4/28/2020 at 9:12 AM, STENDEC said:

 

If you are suffering from chronic, nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, a course of high dose vitamin D (50-100k IU/week) might make some sense.

I take the Bronson D3/K2 supplement which is like 5000UI daily.  It wouldnt hurt to get that up to 50K.  I find honestly, the biggest thing for people like me is acceptance.  Part of it is the health part but the other is accepting the daily maintenance you need to do managing pain.  The latter is the biggest thing which also of course includes life decisions.  How many times over the years have you guys hear me bitch about the job?  A bad marriage?  Anxiety, PTSD, etc.  This is the third part, changing your life which is the hardest.  leaving a 6 figure job with 2 kids has consequences.  Divorce has consequences. These are all things you are "supposed' to do, "supposed' to be but we all fail at what we are supposed to be and struggle to succeed at who we really are.  To do that, you have to be willing to go back down to zero.  A lot easier said than done.  

 

On another note, my YT channel on art devices is almost 2K subs.  It's called Create Now Sleep Later and I will be expanding it to cover mental health for creative people.  I feel that I need to pay it back for all the people who have helped me over the years when I was in some terrible places.  

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1 hour ago, AlwaysForward said:

The latter is the biggest thing which also of course includes life decisions.

 

There is a fairly large body of research linking psychological pain and specifically anger to physical pain

 

You are probably familiar with John Sarno's work in this area.

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50 minutes ago, STENDEC said:

 

There is a fairly large body of research linking psychological pain and specifically anger to physical pain

 

You are probably familiar with John Sarno's work in this area.

I am.  In my case, since the symptoms travel, neck, back etc.  It's hard to nail down.  PTSD in particular is terribly convoluted when it comes to both managing pain and anxiety.  It's like a merry go round you can't get off of.  

 

Unless of course, you decide to get off.  Many of these therapies work, however the naysayers are not willing to change their life enough to reduce the triggers to something manageable.  It's similar to mindfulness and meditation, if you aren't at all suggestible, you probably won't see much benefit.   Again, though, life is about choices.  

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On 5/2/2020 at 8:08 PM, Emperor G_D said:

I'm a follower, now. You're much different than I expected...

Thats a compliment maybe?  HaHa.  I did a podcast with someone today to start introducing some of the new stuff.  I'm writing scripts now but have 3 videos I need to wrap up first.  Thanks for the follow!

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